Monday, April 29, 2013

Oxycontin: A Gateway to Heroin?

By
Chris Newcomb, M.Div. 

Prescription pills are the rage right now.  People from all walks of life get sucked into using prescription pills for several reasons.  First, many are legitimately prescribed them for legitimate physical pain and the patient doesn't know that their brain is set up for addiction.  Second, some feel that it is ok to go to a doctor and fake pain so they can get these same pills.  Third, others justify that they don't have a problem because these pills are 'made by the manufacturer' so they are 'safer than street drugs'.  To add insult to injury, due to the large demand and short supply of Oxycontin on the street, many people are now 'graduating' from their prescription pill use to a whole new level of addiction via heroin!

Once thought of as just an 'inner-city' drug problem, heroin has now become the chic drug of choice for upwardly mobile members of society.  Doctors, judges, lawyers, accountants, ministers, and other seemingly upstanding professionals are getting caught in the vortex of heroin use via oxycontin abuse.  For example, in a recent U.S.A. Today article*, researchers at the Carolinas Medical Center found that the majority of their abusing patients came from the 5 best neighborhoods in Charlotte, NC. 

At The Coleman Institute, we keep seeing an increase in the number of patients who come in for a heroin detox yet started their drug addiction on Oxycontin.  In most cases, patients believed, naively, that Oxycontin wasn't addictive and that heroin was easy to kick.  All of them believed at one point or another that they had the strength to bear the withdrawals on their own.  None of them succeed which is why they come to see us.  Truth be told, it takes 7-10 days to withdraw off opiates and the majority of people cave between Day 3 and Day 5 because the withdrawal symptoms are that unbearable!  

There is nothing wrong with being on Oxycontin when it is prescribed carefully by a doctor who is very familiar with addiction and who limits the prescription time frame in order to avoid patients getting addicted.  Unfortunately, most doctors have a thumbnail view of addiction, and while they may mean well, they do more damage than good.  Furthermore, many patients who either have an addiction or know that addiction runs in their family refuse to be honest and open with the doctor and staff about their personal and/or family history so they can get their drug of choice.

If you or someone you love is hooked on Oxycontin and/or has graduated to Heroin, we can help!  We specialize in detox from all opiates.  If you have decided that you are tired of being sick and tired of being hooked on drugs and that you are in need of detox from opiates, alcohol, benzos, Methadone, or Suboxone, please do not hesitate to call Jennifer Pius or Amy Stewart at 1-877-77-DETOX (33869)

*For more information, here is the link to the aforementioned article in U.S.A. Today (http://usat.ly/ZwdCPV)

Friday, April 26, 2013

Suboxone - More and More Problems Are Showing Up



By 

Peter R. Coleman, M.D.


Suboxone has become a popular treatment option since its introduction in 2002.  There are a number of reasons for this.  First, opiate addiction is a common problem.  If you add the number of Heroin addicts to all of the people using opiate painkillers in a non- medical way, there are over 30 million people in the US affected by this disease. Second, standard treatments are not very effective.  Opiates are extremely powerful. They are very physically addicting.  It is very difficult for patients to detoxify off them. And if patients are able to get off opiates, it is even more difficult to stay off them. Opiates effect the pleasure center very powerfully.  Patients feel awful when they don’t have them.  Without help, most patients relapse back to opiate use pretty quickly.

Suboxone is very powerful.  It binds very tightly to the opiate receptors so it lasts a very long time.  This means there are less ups and downs than other drugs, which can be helpful when it is used as therapy, but it also means that it lasts a very long time in your system.

In addition, Suboxone turns the opiate receptors on in a powerful way, so it is highly addictive.  Because it lasts a very long time it means that the withdrawal off of Suboxone takes a very long time.  The withdrawal off Suboxone is very unpleasant and lasts much longer than the withdrawal off Heroin or OxyContin.  Patients usually only find out about this when they want to come off their Suboxone.  Some patients report withdrawal symptoms lasting 6 months or more.  As mentioned earlier, the vast majority of patients are not able to detoxify, even with slow weaning down.  They either choose to stay on their Suboxone or they relapse back to street drugs.

Fortunately, here at The Coleman Institute, we have a solution that has a 99% success rate – and only takes 8 days.  Our Accelerated Opiate Detoxification and Naltrexone Implants work very well.  We use a combination of medicines to help patients feel very comfortable.  Our Receptor Restoration Technique gets the brain back to its natural state much faster.  Naltrexone implants give patients the support they need to deal with cravings and allow them to get into real recovery.  It is so nice to see patients come to us and start feeling better so quickly.

At The Coleman Institute, we specialize in helping people get clean clean and stay clean from alcohol and drugs. If you or someone you love has an addiction, we would love to help you heal.  If you are in need of detox from opiates, alcohol, benzos, Methadone, or Suboxone, please do not hesitate to call Jennifer Pius or Amy Stewart at 1-877-77-DETOX (33869)

Who Are You?


By
Chris Newcomb, M.Div. 

One of the hardest things in life is figuring out who we really are and what we are really meant to do.  Usually, people struggle the most with these questions during adolescence.  Ideally, as we grow older, we should become more clear about our self-identity and our purpose in life.  However, many people never experience this growth and get stuck for many different reasons.  This is particularly true for those who struggle with substance abuse. 

I often tell our addicted clients that the 'party scene' tells you that being sober is 'boring, stupid, and lame'.  Oddly enough, people who are sober and don't party often think of the party scene as 'boring, stupid, and lame."  Therefore, it is really a matter of opinion as to what is truly boring, stupid, and lame.  

Before you jump to conclusions, please understand that I am not judging those who do party or who have partied in the past.  The reality is all of us want to be accepted and loved for who we are right where we are and there is nothing wrong with that.  However, most of us give into peer pressure at some point because the power of conformity is very strong.  Conformity may or may not be a bad thing depending upon your perspective.  When it comes to substance abuse, we believe that conformity is deadly.  

So, on this Friday, I ask you:  Who Are You?  Do you know?  Do you care?  If you don't care, why?  Take some time over the weekend to figure out the answers.  When you know who you are,  you don't care about who they think you should be or what they think you should do.  So give yourself permission today to just be.  And then, to just be You. And finally, to be you well!

At The Coleman Institute, we specialize in helping people get clean clean and stay clean from alcohol and drugs. If you or someone you love has an addiction, we would love to help you heal.  If you are in need of detox from opiates, alcohol, benzos, Methadone, or Suboxone, please do not hesitate to call Jennifer Pius or Amy Stewart at 1-877-77-DETOX (33869)

Thursday, April 25, 2013

Signal to Noise Ratio

By
Chris Newcomb, M.Div. 

In engineering, there an idea known as the 'signal to noise ratio'.  In layman's terms, this means a comparison between a desired signal level (i.e. meaningful information) compared to the level of background noise (i.e. unwanted signal)  This may sounds a little confusing to the unintiated but it's really simple to understand.  

For example, a friend of mine's father has a hearing disorder: he refuses to wear hearing aids!  He is a deaf as a door nail!  His signal to noise ratio is awful.  The noise ratio, that is the surrounding sounds (as well as poor hearing), keep him from hearing the person who is speaking to him.  That's why his common refrain is, "What?  What did you say?  Can you repeat that?"  We all dutifully repeat ourselves umpteen times while thinking to ourselves, "For the love of all things holy, please buy a hearing aid for goodness sakes!!!"  

What is your signal to noise ratio in recovery?  Perhaps you have not thought of this concept.  What I mean is are you able to hear the 'voices of recovery' over the noise of the other voices out there (i.e. partying friends, drug dealers, T.V. commercials, etc.)?  Maybe you have not realized how loud the background noise in our culture can be.  It's a good thing to pay attention to so that your sobriety stays strong and consistent.

If you're ignoring the background noise, it begs the question what are you actually listening to?  This would be the 'signal level' I spoke of earlier.  The 'signal' is heard in places like the greater recovery community such as Alcoholics Anonymous and Narcotics Anonymous.  You hear it in the 'voice' of writers like Tian Dayton whose classic book Emotional Sobriety is helpful to so many in recovery.  

This week I challenge you to pay attention to your 'signal to noise ratio' as it relates to your recovery.  Pay attention to the sounds around you.  Choose whether or not you are going to listen to them or change the station, so to speak.  Keep your signal high and drown out the noise of anything that opposes your addiction.  You'll be glad you listened!  

At The Coleman Institute, we specialize in helping people get clean clean and stay clean from alcohol and drugs. If you or someone you love has an addiction, we would love to help you heal.  If you are in need of detox from opiates, alcohol, benzos, Methadone, or Suboxone, please do not hesitate to call Jennifer Pius or Amy Stewart at 1-877-77-DETOX (33869)


Friday, April 19, 2013

What's Your Excuse?



By 

Chris Newcomb, M.Div. 

Excuses.  We all have them.  We all 'need' them at some point or another to get us out of something we don't want to do.  They are the sign of a 'good quitter'.  That term, of course, is an oxymoron!

Do you use excuses?  Do you look for excuses regularly to help get you out of situations you don't like or desire to be in?  If so, STOP IT!  Ok, no more cyber yelling, but seriously, please stop making excuses for your own sake.  It's holding you back. 

When it comes to substance abuse recovery, there is no room for excuses.  There is too much at stake!  Your life depends on it.  Believe me, that is not melodrama.  It is the truth.  

My challenge for you today is to turn off your cell phone for a few minutes.  Cut off the T.V..  Sit quietly and allow yourself to really open up and be honest with yourself about all the areas of your life where you are operating with excuses.  Identify them and then analyze them for what they are.  The point is not to beat yourself up or judge yourself harshly rather it is just to become aware of the deeper ways your attitude and mindset(s) affect your life positively or negatively.  Then decide what, if any, good they are doing for you.  If you decide they are no longer good or helpful, discard them for good.  Remember that excuses keep you from achieving all the great things you want to achieve in your life.  Don't use them.  Face reality.  Face it and don't avoid it.  You'll be so happy that you took that brave step of self-analysis to eliminate all your excuses!   

At The Coleman Institute, we specialize in helping people get clean clean and stay clean from alcohol and drugs. If you or someone you love has an addiction, we would love to help you heal.  If you are in need of detox from opiates, alcohol, benzos, Methadone, or Suboxone, please do not hesitate to call Jennifer Pius or Amy Stewart at 1-877-77-DETOX (33869)

Thursday, April 18, 2013

Today or Tomorrow?!?





“Tomorrow”
(Noun)
"A mystical land where 99% of all human productivity, motivation, and achievement is stored" - Anonymous



“The sun will come out tomorrow,” sang little Orphan Annie in the movie of the same name.    And that is very true.  However, perhaps it might rain.  How about snow?  No, Annie was not an amateur weather forecaster rather she was saying that things might be bad today but tomorrow they will get better. 

Similarly, we often believe that putting off something for tomorrow that we should do today will make the project easier or better.  Perhaps even more sunny!  Generally, this is just not the case. 

Recovery teaches us to care for ourselves now.  We can’t wait to stay sober.  We can’t wait to recover.  To wait can often mean to overdose.  To wait can mean to die.  To be arrested.  To be institutionalized.  If that’s the case, it won’t be a sunny day for sure regardless of whether the sun comes out or not!

Today is the real land where 100% of human productivity, motivation, and achievement can be available if we choose to embrace it.  There is no greater productivity, motivation, or achievement than that which involves recovery from substance abuse. 

Please do not put off for tomorrow what you can absolutely do today! 

- Chris Newcomb, M.Div.

Monday, April 15, 2013

Why Do You Need to Detox When You Could Just Quit ‘Cold Turkey’?


Often times people ask themselves, "why do I need to detox when I can just quit 'cold turkey'?"  It's a fair question.  Some people can detox themselves at home without medical assistance.  However, that is a very small number of people.  The majority of people need help detoxing off drugs and/or alcohol.  Could you be one of them?

On average, it takes someone 7-10 days to completely detox off their substance(s) of choice and be completely clean.  Most fail without help.  As a matter of fact, most cave-in between Day 3 and Day 5 because the withdrawal symptoms are too severe.  These symptoms such as diarrhea, vomiting, cold chills, sweats, shaking, and confusion are very debilitating and relief seems nowhere in sight.  

The good news is that you can make a different choice today.  You don't have to go through the pain of withdrawal on your own again.  The first step is to decide that this thing is bigger than you and that you need help.  It's ok not to have it all together and to need assistance.  But the old adage still remains true: you can lead a horse to water but you can't make him drink.  The choice is yours.  Let us help you help yourself today.  You'll be glad you did!

At The Coleman Institute, we specialize in helping people get clean clean and stay clean from alcohol and drugs. If you or someone you love has an addiction, we would love to help you heal.  If you are in need of detox from opiates, alcohol, benzos, Methadone, or Suboxone, please do not hesitate to call Jennifer Pius or Amy Stewart at 1-877-77-DETOX (33869)

Wednesday, April 10, 2013

"I Wasn't Myself!" Sound familiar?

Ever feel like you're not yourself?   Feel like a stranger in your own skin?  There's help. Check this out...




At The Coleman Institute, we specialize in helping people get clean clean and stay clean from alcohol and drugs. If you or someone you love has an addiction, we would love to help you heal.  If you are in need of detox from opiates, alcohol, benzos, Methadone, or Suboxone, please do not hesitate to call Jennifer Pius or Amy Stewart at 1-877-77-DETOX (33869).

Monday, April 8, 2013

Suboxone is Not the Answer!

If you are struggling to get off of opiates and you made the switch to suboxone, you may find yourself worse off than when you started.  Suboxone is not the miracle drug people once thought.  It is switching one addiction for another.  We can help you get off Suboxone for good!  



At The Coleman Institute, we specialize in helping people get clean clean and stay clean from alcohol and drugs. If you or someone you love has an addiction, we would love to help you heal.  If you are in need of detox from opiates, alcohol, benzos, Methadone, or Suboxone, please do not hesitate to call Jennifer Pius or Amy Stewart at 1-877-77-DETOX (33869).

Friday, April 5, 2013

Withdrawal

 You don't have to go through withdrawal alone.  We can help.  You are not alone.  



At The Coleman Institute, we specialize in helping people get clean clean and stay clean from alcohol and drugs. If you or someone you love has an addiction, we would love to help you heal.  If you are in need of detox from opiates, alcohol, benzos, Methadone, or Suboxone, please do not hesitate to call Jennifer Pius or Amy Stewart at 1-877-77-DETOX (33869).