Friday, March 29, 2013

An Inconvenient Gift



By 

Chris Newcomb, M.Div. 

I was walking to a local restaurant for lunch one day after a long morning in the office.  As I was ruminating to myself over the tasks that needed to be accomplished that afternoon, a woman interrupted my musing with a question.  "Sir, can you help me?  I'm really hungry and have no money to get something to eat, " she said earnestly.  Immediately, my 'skeptic flag' flew up and I thought to myself, "Lady, I just want to eat lunch alone and you think I'm going to fall for that load of garbage when all you're going to do is go buy drugs and get high!"  I work for an alcohol and drug detox center, nonetheless, so I am a bit tainted in my perspective on this subject unfortunately.  Sarah, it turns out, would prove me wrong.  

Suddenly the thought occurred to me, "maybe she really is hungry.  Let's find out!  I'd be happy to buy you a meal at this restaurant I'm going to if you would like, " I offered.  She smiled and enthusiastically agreed.  Maybe she didn't want drugs and alcohol after all.

Silently, we walked into the restaurant.  We stood in line and she placed her order.  When the time came, I paid the bill for her.  She had a smile on her face.  We made some small talk.  We walked back outside the restaurant and started to part ways.  She told me, "Thank you so much because I was so hungry.  God bless you.!"  I wished her well and got in my car to leave. 

I had an unsettled feeling inside me as I drove back to the office.  Why did I question her like that?  Why couldn't I just give her money?  Why did I not give her the benefit of the doubt?  

I didn't have immediate answers to those questions but I did realize that when I thought about her eating that sandwich I smiled.  I realized that while I may have done a 'good deed' it wasn't without internal conflict and judgment.  Alas, Sara smiled and so did I.  That was the highlight of my day.  And I tell you this not to brag but to give a loud 'Amen' to the quote at the beginning of this article!

With that said, sobriety can seem like an inconvenient gift.  It's not what you ask for.  You don't want to open it.  You're sure it's going to be another awkward colored sweater from your mother but then you find out it's indescribably awesome.  Much like food on an empty stomach.  Get sober.  It's worth it.  It's free.  You don't have to pay for it.  Give yourself the gift and then pass it on!

At The Coleman Institute, we specialize in helping people get clean clean and stay clean from alcohol and drugs. If you or someone you love has an addiction, we would love to help you heal.  If you are in need of detox from opiates, alcohol, benzos, Methadone, or Suboxone, please do not hesitate to call Jennifer Pius or Amy Stewart at 1-877-77-DETOX (33869).

Wednesday, March 27, 2013

A Safe, Effective Heroin Detox


 Do you need to detox off of opiates such as heroin or oxycontin?  If so, we can help.  To learn more, watch this short video below:


  


At The Coleman Institute, we specialize in helping people get clean clean and stay clean from alcohol and drugs. If you or someone you love has an addiction, we would love to help you heal.  If you are in need of detox from opiates, alcohol, benzos, Methadone, or Suboxone, please do not hesitate to call Jennifer Pius or Amy Stewart at 1-877-77-DETOX (33869).

Tuesday, March 19, 2013

Dream On.






By
Chris Newcomb, M.Div.

 "Dream on,
Dream on,
Dream until your dreams come true" - Aerosmith


Have you ever had a dream?  When you were a kid, did you ever dream of being as strong as Superman, as fast as The Flash, or as beautiful as a Princess?  We all have dreams at some point in our lives about who we want to become.  It is part of human nature.  Unfortunately, most of us give up on our dreams long before it’s time to quit.  

A dream is simply, “a strongly desired goal or purpose.”  When you wanted to make the honor roll as a kid, you had a dream.  When you wanted to win first place in your swim team competition, you had a dream.  When you want to be Teacher of the Year, you have a dream.  And, believe it or not, when you want to break free from the chains of addiction, you have a dream.

Sobriety, for many drug users, is nothing but a distant dream.  It feels unrealistic.  It seems impossible.  It feels way too difficult to achieve.  Many addicts disregard their dream and choose to remain in the shackles of addiction.  

Do you dream of freedom from addiction?  Do you dream of never having to chase after another fix ever again?  Do you dream of living your life full of love, laughter, and sobriety?  Then why don’t you go get it?  Dreams are nothing if you don’t take action.

So dream until your dreams come true!

At The Coleman Institute, we specialize in helping people get clean clean and stay clean from alcohol and drugs. If you or someone you love has an addiction, we would love to help you heal.  If you are in need of detox from opiates, alcohol, benzos, Methadone, or Suboxone, please do not hesitate to call Jennifer Pius or Amy Stewart at 1-877-77-DETOX (33869).

The Ability to Sit Through Discomfort

By 
Dr. Peter Coleman, M.D. 


After I had been clean and sober for about 6 months, I started to notice quite a few people had already relapsed and were back on drugs and alcohol.  This bothered me and made me fear for my own sobriety.  I asked my therapist if he thought I was going to make it or not.  He told me that there are many factors that determine people’s success, but one of them is the ability to sit through pain.  He told me that I was already doing all of the right things – going to meetings, working with a sponsor, reading healthy literature, etc.  I had already changed my friends and the things I was doing.  He also thought I was very good at sitting through pain, so he said that he thought I would make it.  I liked his answer.
 
The truth is my therapist may have sensed that I am pretty good at sitting through discomfort, but I certainly am not perfect at it.  In my time, I have certainly overreacted to pain and discomfort.  At times, I have felt so afraid that I’ve made bad decisions and judgments.  Then I’ve done things that are not helpful.  I may have said something that hurt someone else or made a situation worse.  I have done things that hurt someone or made the situation worse. 

There is a philosophy in recovery circles that everything changes – some people say this about the weather –“if you don’t like the weather, just stick around, because it will change”.  The concept with feelings is the same-“if you are feeling really happy and everything is going great -  get over it because it won’t last!”  The opposite is also very true.  If you are feeling anxious, get over it because it won’t last.  Fortunately I have now been clean and sober long enough that I know that this is true.  I have experienced enough periods of anxiety that I am absolutely certain that I will come out of it and feel better – and usually I feel better much more quickly than I thought I would.  In my experience, feelings or anxiety usually don’t last more than a few hours.  And of course, like anything that we practice, we get better at it.  The more often we practice sitting through anxiety, the quicker it goes away.  So, next time you feel all anxious and worried that things aren’t just the way you think they should be – be happy because you have just been given a great learning opportunity!

At The Coleman Institute, we specialize in helping people get clean clean and stay clean from alcohol and drugs. If you or someone you love has an addiction, we would love to help you heal.  If you are in need of detox from opiates, alcohol, benzos, Methadone, or Suboxone, please do not hesitate to call Jennifer Pius or Amy Stewart at 1-877-77-DETOX (33869).

Friday, March 15, 2013

Desperate To Change


By

Chris Newcomb, M.Div. 
 
Today I met 3 different patients with 3 different stories.  The first, a middle-aged woman, was addicted on pain pills.  An incredible athlete, she looked to be in the prime of her life not someone who was hooked on opiates.  Cloaked in shame, she was afraid to leave detox because of the changes she would have to make and the pain she might feel in the process.  

The second patient was a man in his early 20's who was in withdrawal from opiates.  He was not feeling good physically.  His mother was anxious for a speedy recovery for her son.  This was his first legitimate attempt at getting clean and staying clean from his drug addiction.  

Last, I spoke to a medical student in his late 20's.  He was coming off of a suboxone maintenance dose that was his normal daily regimen for the past 5 years.  He was ready and felt confident that he was turning over a new leaf through his detox this week.  

The common thread that ran through each of these stories is this: they were all desperate to change.  Desperation is the emotional state of inner despair over a situation that seems helpless and without change.  It is the most common feeling for people stuck in substance abuse.  Each of these patients, for completely different reasons, were desperate to change the course of their lives. 

We often think that being 'desperate' is a bad thing.  Sometimes, for sure, it isn't a very exciting option.  However, sometimes being desperate is a good thing.  In this case, being desperate to escape the claws of potential sickness, financial ruin, legal issues, and/or death, is a very good thing!  

Are you desperate to change?  Where are you today in your life circumstances?  Is there something you've been putting off that to change would radically re-orient your life in a powerful way?  Sometimes desperation is a good thing.  Give in to it today.  Change your life.  Watch how you will change in the process!  

At The Coleman Institute, we specialize in helping people get clean clean and stay clean from alcohol and drugs. If you or someone you love has felt the bite of addiction, we would love to help you heal.  If you are in need of detox from opiates, alcohol, benzos, Methadone, or Suboxone, please do not hesitate to call Jennifer Pius or Amy Stewart at 1-877-77-DETOX (33869).

Wednesday, March 13, 2013

Acceptance: It Is What It Is!


By
Chris Newcomb, M.Div. 
 
Reality Bites.  It's actually the name of a movie in the 1990's that was popular amongst 20-30 somethings about the sometimes cruel nature of life, love, and other mysteries.  Certainly, the title is a bit humorous albeit somewhat cynical.  And truthful.  At times.  

Acceptance is a very difficult concept to practice even though it is quite easy to comprehend.  Reality is indifferent to our wants, needs, and desires.  We often spend a lot of time and energy at odds with reality.  We expect this.  We want that.  We get something else.  Sometimes, we get more than we expect and are pleasantly surprised.  Either way, it is what it is. 

What is the key to acceptance?  There isn't one.  It is a choice.  It is the tough choice to choose to accept whatever reality brings and know that you can persevere through that particular reality in time and space.  

Feelings about reality are a completely different but related topic.  Often, it is not necessarily the reality of a situation that is bad rather it is the emotions that are elicited from that reality that make it bad.   Expectations are future resentments waiting to happen.  When our expectations are dashed, resentment is easy to pick up.  Choosing to accept reality as it is AND also honor our feelings about that reality is the healthiest way to live life.  We must take it a step further and examine our resentments and seek to let them go. 

I had a friend who would always say, "it is what it is" and it used to annoy me.  As I've grown in my understanding and comfort with that notion, I see the wisdom of his words.  The reality is, pardon the pun, it is what it is and it isn't what it could or should be, so to speak.  That fact is indisputable.

In the end, reality isn't all that bad.  Think of the alternative.  Learning to accept where we are, who we are, and what happens or doesn't happen in our life is our biggest challenge.  When we begin to do that, life doesn't seem as bad.  Reality bites, for sure, but often times she kisses.  Don't forget to pucker up in expectation!  

At The Coleman Institute, we specialize in helping people get clean clean and stay clean from alcohol and drugs. If you or someone you love has felt the bite of addiction, we would love to help you heal.  If you are in need of detox from opiates, alcohol, benzos, Methadone, or Suboxone, please do not hesitant to call Jennifer Pius or Amy Stewart at 1-877-77-DETOX (33869).

Friday, March 8, 2013

"A Better Life" - Heroin Detox Testimonial

Stuck on heroin and looking for a better life? Want to be free? Need to get clean and stay clean? We can help! Listen to this testimonial...call us...we want to help YOU!