Friday, February 22, 2013

Help, Hope and Healing


I love the sunrise.  I love waking up at 5am and seeing the literal start of a brand new day.  Of course, those first few moments after I wake up can be a bit painful as my mind cries out 400 ways to Sunday why I should go back into the nice quiet, warm bed from whence I just came!  Usually, I don't listen.

A new day signifies three things to me:  help, hope and healing.  An old book says that "there may be pain in the night but joy comes in the morning."  I find this to be true.  Something about watching the receding shadows as the light marches across the horizon gives me a sense of power that help is on the way.  It's a new day!

Just as the new dawn signifies help, it also symbolizes hope for me.  If I messed up yesterday, I can always start over today.  Today's outcome could dwarf yesterday's failures.  All I have to do is try!

Finally, the new sunrise is healing to me.  I am human and can only do but so much and need respite.  I need a break in space in time like everyone else.  Rest helps with that need.  Starting over helps with that need.  And a new sunrise is healing to my soul because I know like the old saying states, "in the end it will be ok.  If it's not ok, it's not the end!"  

Set your alarm for 5am tomorrow.  Watch the sun come up (wear sunglasses).  Bathe in the light of help, hope, and healing!

At The Coleman Institute, we specialize in helping people get clean clean and stay clean from alcohol and drugs. If you or someone you love is in need of detox from opiates, alcohol, benzos, Methadone, or Suboxone, please do not hesitant to call Jennifer Pius or Amy Stewart at 1-877-77-DETOX (33869).

How Much Do I Need to Examine Myself and How Much Do I Need to Change?


When people are living in active addiction, things are not going well. Sometimes there are big problems and sometimes there are small problems. There are always problems of one kind or another. People in their active addiction are not happy with how things are going – and they are not happy with how they are behaving. They need to change. In fact, it is an obvious truth that if people don’t change then things will stay the same – and that never works out well! 

Some people come to addiction because of trauma and pain and the need to escape. Some come to addiction because they love to party and feel a thrill of excitement. And some come to it because of physical pain and medicines that are prescribed by well-meaning physicians. But no matter how we come to it, the end results have a lot of similarities. There are negative consequences. Usually these negative consequences include a low self-esteem and a low self-respect.

In active addiction there has usually been a breakdown of some of our moral codes and ethics. We have done things that we shouldn’t do. We have done things that we told ourselves we wouldn’t do. Sometimes these are dramatic things like stealing or cheating or lying. Sometimes they are fairly minor things. Even people who become addicted to pain medicines will often do things they are not proud of. They will sometimes take medicines when they aren’t really in much physical pain, but they take them to feel better emotionally. They may take opiate pain medicine because they are angry or depressed, or they just want to escape for a while. They may take pain medicine because they want to reward themselves or feel a little excitement. So, now they are taking medicine in ways it was not prescribed for – they are abusing the medicine –- and how can people feel good about themselves when they do that?

When people come to treatment and want to change, they have to become willing to really face themselves. One of the exercises we had to do when I was in treatment back in 1984, was to look at ourselves in the mirror. We had to take a long look at who we really were, who we had become. We had to do it often enough until we were comfortable with the results. There are many ways to face yourself. Looking in the mirror is one way to see your physical being. The 12 steps of AA and NA include a process to make a “thorough and complete moral inventory of ourselves” That is very powerful way to face ourselves and see who we really have become. It is especially powerful when this self-examination is combined with confessing our faults to another human being.

Of course, once we have really faced the things we have done in our active addiction, it becomes time to make amends and forgive ourselves. The way we acted in active addiction is no reflection on who really are and how we behave in recovery.
So, it is clear that change is essential if we are to become the people we truly want to be. One of my first advisors said to me,” Peter, staying in recovery is really very simple. You only have to do three things. Firstly, don’t drink or use drugs. Secondly, work an active recovery program….and thirdly, change absolutely every aspect of your life!”  

At The Coleman Institute, we specialize in helping people get clean clean and stay clean from alcohol and drugs. If you or someone you love is in need of detox from opiates, alcohol, benzos, Methadone, or Suboxone, please do not hesitant to call Jennifer Pius or Amy Stewart at 1-877-77-DETOX (33869).



Thursday, February 21, 2013

Dr. Peter Coleman Welcomes You to The Coleman Institute

At The Coleman Institute, we understand the pain of drug and alcohol addiction and withdrawal. We are committed to help you get clean and stay clean so you can live the life you've always wanted to live. Welcome to The Coleman Institute: Help, Hope, and Healing for you!

At The Coleman Institute, we specialize in helping people get clean clean and stay clean from alcohol and drugs. If you or someone you love is in need of detox from opiates, alcohol, benzos, Methadone, or Suboxone, please do not hesitant to call Jennifer Pius or Amy Stewart at 1-877-77-DETOX (33869).

Tuesday, February 19, 2013

Dr. Coleman on Methadone Usage

Methadone appears to be a wonder drug for many people. But is it really that great of an alternative for opiate users? Dr. Coleman discusses Methadone usage in this informative video.




At The Coleman Institute, we specialize in helping people get clean clean and stay clean from alcohol and drugs. If you or someone you love is in need of detox from opiates, alcohol, benzos, Methadone, or Suboxone, please do not hesitant to call Jennifer Pius or Amy Stewart at 1-877-77-DETOX (33869).

Friday, February 15, 2013

The 12 Steps Simplified

 The 12 Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous have been a tremendous force in healing the lives of thousands and thousands of alcoholics since their introduction in the early 1900's.  However, for many people, they struggle with understanding the essence of each step.  This, of course, can be solved by regular attendance of A.A. meetings or work with a sponsor.  

If you are not able to do so, we have just the 'cheat sheet' for you!  Below is an abbreviated or simplified version of the 12 Steps that you can print out and post at your desk or put in your wallet or purse for quick reference if things feel out of hand and you need to reconnect with your recovery.  Enjoy!



At The Coleman Institute, we specialize in helping people get clean clean and stay clean from alcohol and drugs. If you or someone you love is in need of detox from opiates, alcohol, benzos, Methadone, or Suboxone, please do not hesitant to call Jennifer Pius or Amy Stewart at 1-877-77-DETOX (33869). 

Monday, February 11, 2013

5 Ways How to Stay Clean and Enjoy Life

Have you spent a lot of time getting clean only to relapse back into your old patterns of behavior?  Have you sworn up and down repeatedly that you will never use again only to turn around and do exactly that?  Consistency is a difficult thing to do isn't it?  The way to stay clean and enjoy life starts and ends with consistency*.

1.  Be consistent.  Whatever you do, be consistent.  Habits rightly formed remain habits for life.  Pay attention to what you do each day.  If you don't like what you do and the results that come from that action(s), change the action and the habit will follow. 
2.  Walk away - That's right.  Walk away from people, places, and things that are triggers for you.
3.  Ask for help.  Tough guys are for the movies.  Real guys ask for help.  It's ok.  And no, you're not a wimp if you do. 
4.  Find a hobby - It's hard to get high when you're playing guitar, riding a horse, painting, or exercising at the gym.  
5.  Practice gratitude - Everyday when you wake up, write down a few things in life for which you are grateful.  Every night before you go to bed, write down a few things that happened that day that for which you are grateful.  
6* - Pay It Forward - That's right.  Free of charge, I just gave you an extra free tip.  Now pay it forward.  If you know someone who could benefit from these suggestions, pay it forward.  Send it to them by email or fax or even read it to them over the phone.  Make a difference.  Encourage someone else and be encouraged yourself in the process! 

*Recovery is a life-long process that requires vigilance and action in a person's mental, emotional, physical, sexual, and spiritual life.  Recovery is a process and different suggestions work differently for different people.  However, the point is to be consistent in NOT doing what you did before that got you into the mess that you were in when you decided to quit. 

At The Coleman Institute, we specialize in helping people get clean clean and stay clean from alcohol and drugs. If you or someone you love is in need of detox from opiates, alcohol, benzos, Methadone, or Suboxone, please do not hesitant to call Jennifer Pius or Amy Stewart at 1-877-77-DETOX (33869).

Monday, February 4, 2013