Tuesday, January 29, 2013

Dr. Peter Coleman explains the Methadone Detox by The Coleman Institute

Methadone is not all its cracked up to be! Listen as Dr. Peter Coleman discusses the importance of detoxing OFF of methadone in order to have TRUE freedom!

Friday, January 25, 2013

Dr. Peter Coleman Explains the Mission of The Coleman Institute

Not every detox center is the same...check out this informative video by Dr. Peter Coleman, National Medical Director of The Coleman Institute!

Thursday, January 24, 2013

Dr. Peter Coleman on Naltrexone Implants

Listen to Dr. Peter Coleman discuss the amazing properties of Naltrexone Implants that help people get clean and stay clean off opiates!



Wednesday, January 23, 2013

Not All Alcohol Detoxes Are the Same!

Alcohol detox can be a dangerous procedure without the proper medical supervision.  Not all alcohol detoxes are the same.  Dr. Peter Coleman of The Coleman Institute explains below:




Friday, January 18, 2013

Video Killed the Drug Habit?!?

If you were alive in 1981, you might remember a small television music station known as MTV hit the airwaves with the first ever rock-n-roll video called 'Video Killed the Radio Star" by The Buggles. It was a worldwide hit.
Likewise, The Coleman Institute released brand new videos on our You Tube page in order to help people find a way out of the plague of drug and alcohol problems and addictions. We're hoping that we can make a world wide impact to a new tune entitled, "Video Killed the Drug Habit"! So, take a minute and watch the video below.  If you find you like it, please feel free to share it with anyone you know who needs substance abuse education so they can start a new, clean life. Enjoy!

Thursday, January 17, 2013

Are Treatment Centers Backing Off from the Goal of Complete Abstinence?




Recently, Hazelden announced that they were going to start to allow patients in their treatment program, and patients discharged from their treatment program, to take addictive medications.  This includes letting their patients being discharged home on Suboxone.  This decision is such a radical departure from their past philosophy that it is difficult to overstate it.  Hazelden, in Center City, Minnesota, was one of the first abstinence-based treatment programs in the world.  Hazelden has been so influential that standard 28-day treatment programs are still referred to as following the ‘Minnesota Model”.  Hazelden began in 1949 and based its treatment programs and philosophy squarely on their interpretation of the 12 steps of AA.  Part of that philosophy, as some interpreted it, is that any medication that may be used as a crutch hurts the chances of long-term sobriety.  Some people believe that any medicine that is a crutch is dangerous because patients shouldn’t use a crutch – they need to rely on their program, their sponsor, and their Higher Power.  So, in the past, Hazelden would restrict almost all medications and certainly not allow patients to be discharged on an addictive medication like Suboxone.

So, how could it be that Hazelden has now decided that it will allow patients to come to their treatment program and be discharged on an addictive drug that is itself very difficult to be detoxified from?  Hazelden was so staunchly opposed to any medications that could be used as a crutch that, a few years ago, they actually refused to admit one of our patients.  Our patient had completed a difficult detoxification off opiates and we had inserted one of our Naltrexone implants – a completely non-addictive medication that has no mood-altering effect.  The patient was very well motivated and was following our advice to go to an intensive treatment program.  He was willing to take the time, and spend the money and go to a 28 day program, so that he could enhance his chance of long-term sobriety.  The directors at Hazelden refused to allow him to be admitted unless he had the implant removed.  They refused to make an exception even after I called them and pointed out that Naltrexone is safe, non- addictive and is not mood-altering.  I also pointed out how serious this young man was, and how much he wanted to learn how to stay sober.  So, he came back to us, we removed his implant, and he went to treatment.

The reality is that success rates for patients who have opiate dependence is very low. Success rates of being opiate free 12 months after treatment are probably around 5 – 10%. This seems to be true even if patients complete a 28 day treatment.  Success rates do go up if patients participate in an extended (3-4 month) program.  Such a low success rate is the reason why, for over 40 years,  it has become quite an acceptable practice to put opiate dependent patients on Methadone.  For the last few years, it has also been possible for patients to go onto Suboxone, which is another long acting, “safer” narcotic.  It does seem logical that, if the alternative is relapse back to active drug addiction, it is better to put patients onto a controlled narcotic that has less abuse potential.

So, it is understandable that Hazelden would seriously consider using Suboxone to keep their patients from relapsing back to active opiate addiction.  But, the fact is, that Suboxone is not the best option to keep patients from relapsing.  Naltrexone is a blocking drug that can also prevent relapse and help patients stay clean long enough so that they do not relapse. And Naltrexone is not addictive or mood altering.  A number of studies have shown that twelve month success rates using Naltrexone implants are around 60%.

We have been using Naltrexone implants for over 14 years and have seen remarkable successes.  Now Vivitrol is also available as a monthly Naltrexone injection.  We believe that opiate dependent patients do need support to help them get clean and stay clean. We believe that, for the vast majority of patients, Naltrexone implants or Injections are the preferred method of providing that support and helping patients achieve long-term sobriety! 

At The Coleman Institute, we specialize in helping people get clean clean and stay clean from alcohol and drugs. If you or someone you love is in need of detox from opiates, alcohol, benzos, Methadone, or Suboxone, please do not hesitant to call Jennifer Pius at 1-877-77-DETOX (33869).  Have a happy, healthy new year!



Natural Transitions


It's a rainy day here in Richmond, Va where I sit at my desk writing this blog article.  On the way to work this morning, I was trying to think of a happy, positive topic to write about to inspire you to greatness in your life and sobriety.  Unfortunately, life had other plans for me: I'm going to a funeral today.  Cancel that idea.  

Death stinks.  There I said it.  I'm sure you would agree.  Unfortunately, a childhood friend, whom I've known since 1st grade, lost his mother a few days ago to cancer.  I grew up playing basketball at their house and his mother was a very nice lady.  It's an awful loss for anyone.  I was not really close to his mother but I feel I need to go to support my old friend.  And while it is a 'natural transition', that doesn't make the pain any less for those who feel the immediate loss and those who watch unable to remove their pain.  

However, all is not lost.  Life goes on.  The funeral will happen.  His mother will be laid to rest.  Friends and family will express love, sympathy, and condolences.  And life will go on.  

Is it fair?  No.  Is it reality?  Yes.  And 'natural transitions happen to all of us.  Perhaps you can relate from your own experience of losing a loved one.  If you have, I'm sorry for your loss.  If you haven't lost someone you love, please take the time today to tell those you love of their worth to you. None of us are promised anything but this present moment right now.  Let's use this time wisely and connect with those we love.

Much like the loss of someone we love, it is very common for those just entering recovery to experience grief.  When a person decides to get clean and end their relationship with drugs and/or alcohol, it is much like experiencing a death in the family.  This was your closest friend.  Your confidant.  Your teammate.   At least that's what you think at first.  And now it's gone.

However, as grief gives way to understanding, you realize that the drugs and/or alcohol were really none of those things to you.  Your closest friend does not help you slowly kill yourself.  Your closest confidant would tell you that you have a sickness called addiction and that you need help.  A teammate would encourage you to seek help and healing.  Drugs and/alcohol due none of those things.  

So, why do people grieve this 'natural transition' when they quit using?  I believe there are a couple of reasons.  First, there is the biological reality that your brain has to get healthy again and repair itself from the abuse.  The subsequent withdrawal makes people pine for their 'lost love' to come take away the pain.  Second, I believe most of us are a sentimental and pleasure-seeking bunch and we attach ourselves to people, places, and things that give us pleasure.  Last, denial that the 'relationship' we had with drugs and/or alcohol was not a real relationship and just a facade takes a while to sink in and shatter our illusions of reality so we can become grounded in reality.  

The good news is there is help!  Grieving people can take care of themselves!  They can ask for help.  They can talk about their feelings.  They can seek out positive behaviors and positive people for support.  Getting good rest, eating right, and have connection with sober people will go along way in dealing with any residual grief you may encounter as you move further into sobriety. 

What natural transition(s) do you need to make today?  Is there something you desperately need to change but don't know where to start?  Have you started on the path of transition only to turn back after 100 yards?  Perhaps you need to turn around.  There's always time while we're alive to change!

At The Coleman Institute, we specialize in helping people get clean clean and stay clean from alcohol and drugs. If you or someone you love is ready to make the next natural tratransition to sobriety and are in need of detox from opiates, alcohol, benzos, Methadone, or Suboxone, please do not hesitant to call Jennifer Pius or Amy Stewart at 1-877-77-DETOX (33869).  Have a happy, healthy new year!

Friday, January 11, 2013

Oxycontin Detox Testimony

Are you struggling with addiction to Oxycontin?  Do you need to detox off this highly addictive drug but aren't sure where to turn for help?  Help, hope, and healing begin at The Coleman Institute.  We would love to help you get clean and stay clean!  Please call us today at 1-877-773-3869 today.  


Thursday, January 10, 2013

S.M.A.R.T. Recovery Resolutions


A new year brings hope for change and self-improvement.  Generally speaking, the resolutions you make are a good thing.  But are they realistic?  Are you setting yourself up to fail? Statistically speaking, most people will “fail” at keeping their resolutions. A recent article in the Journal of Clinical Psychology stated that about 45% of Americans make resolutions, but only 8% of us succeed. If your resolution is to get clean and stay clean from drugs and alcohol, BRAVO! You are already headed in the right mental direction.  
We want you to be in the 8% of people that succeed, so here are some tips to keep your recovery resolutions S.M.A.R.T. 
  
  • Specific: We love the goal to get clean and stay clean, but it is fairly broad.  Here is an example of a more specific resolution—“My goal is to complete a detox and comprehensive rehab program by the end of January 2013 and be 100% committed to sobriety.” 
  • Measurable: Goals that are quantifiable help you know if you have achieved them.  It establishes specific criteria for you to meet.  A measurable goal could be “I will go to 90 meetings in 90 days and journal 4-5 days per week”. 
  • Attainable: We want you to succeed in your resolution to be recovered, and think baby steps are important in doing so.   Taking small steps towards recovery makes the overall goal more manageable.  For example, while a tobacco-free lifestyle is ideal, it is not a good time to quit smoking cigarettes in the early stages of your recovery from drugs or alcohol as it may increase your overall stress level.  In short, do not bite off more than you can chew!
  • Realistic and Results-driven: Can you realistically achieve this goal at this time in your life? You have to be ready—spiritually, emotionally, and physically, etc.—to make significant changes in your life to get clean and stay clean.  Secondly, recovery resolutions are extremely results-driven.  In our work, there aren’t many “gray areas” for sobriety.  Either you are or you aren’t clean.  If you are smoking marijuana, you are not 100% sober. 
  • Timely: Giving yourself deadlines, both small and large, gives your recovery resolutions a greater sense of urgency.  Look at small goals that can be achieved on a daily, weekly, and monthly basis.  Our most successful patients know to take it one day at a time, but they also have an over-arching, larger goal in mind.  For example, “I have been 82 days clean and want to continue daily meetings for the next 3 months”. To write down your own S.M.A.R.T recovery resolutions visit the following page: http://bladeronner.files.wordpress.com/2009/05/smart-goals-refocus.pd 

At The Coleman Institute, we specialize in helping people get clean clean and stay clean from alcohol and drugs. If you or someone you love is in need of detox from opiates, alcohol, benzos, Methadone, or Suboxone, please do not hesitant to call Jennifer Pius at 1-877-77-DETOX (33869).  Have a happy, healthy new year!

Courtney Harden, NP 

Wednesday, January 9, 2013

A New Video for the New You!

Happy New Year!  Now is the time to change.  Change can be difficult.  The truth is YOU can do it!  You just might need some help along the way because addiction is a tough animal to tame.  We're here to help.  Check out our new video below.  We look forward to helping YOU become the NEW YOU!!!



At The Coleman Institute, we specialize in helping people get clean clean and stay clean from alcohol and drugs. If you or someone you love is in need of detox from opiates, alcohol, benzos, Methadone, or Suboxone, please do not hesitant to call Jennifer Pius at 1-877-77-DETOX (33869).

Friday, January 4, 2013

Having vs. Being


By
Chris Newcomb, M.Div.

Having vs Being?  Now that Christmas is through perhaps we can look at this question.  Did you receive a lot of things for Christmas?  Perhaps you didn't.  Maybe you only received one gift.  The constant struggle we have as human beings is trying to fill our insides with other people's outside.  That is we feel the new car will make everything better.  We just know that date with that perfect person is going to set the world just right.  Sometimes we do get momentary satisfaction but it usually doesn't last. 

When we are infants, we do not pine for material things.  We want food, water, and sleep.  The new Lexus is not big on our agenda.  Parents do not see us as incomplete for lacking a car.  We have value just because we exist.  And, I would say, that we were happier when we were infants than many of us are as adults because we have forgotten how to be in order to learn how to have.  

As 2013 approaches, ask yourself where you fit on the having vs. being scale.  Are you focusing on having too much and not enough on being?  If so, how could you work on just 'being' in 2013 while letting go of the need for 'having' so much to feel fulfilled?  It's up to you.  Give it a try and see how much easier it is just to be than to do.  

At The Coleman Institute, we specialize in helping people get clean clean and stay clean from alcohol and drugs.  If you or someone you love is in need of detox from opiatesalcohol, benzos, Methadone, or Suboxone, please do not hesitant to call Jennifer Pius at 1-877-77-DETOX (33869).

Thursday, January 3, 2013

Practice Virtue

By 
Chris Newcomb, M.Div. 

Virtue is an old school word.  It's not used all that much today.  As a matter of fact, you might be wondering what it really means.  Virtue is, "a positive trait or quality deemed to be morally good and thus is valued as a foundation of principle and good moral being."

Why are virtues important?  To answer this question, it might be helpful to look at the opposite of a virtue which is a vice.  A vice is, "a practice or a behavior or habit considered a fault, a negative character trait, a defect, an infirmity, or merely a bad habit."  Types of vices include, but are not limited, alcohol, drugs, gambling, sex, and listening to Justin Beiber (just kidding...maybe).  While we believe in the 'medical model' of addiction at The Coleman Institute, one could say that the outcome of addictive behaviors can be considered as negative.  We, however, do not judge those who choose unwise behaviors as 'bad' or 'immoral'. 

Having said that, most of us have a vice of some sort.  Mine is ice cream.  I could eat it at every meal.  I'd have a heart attack and die but it sure would taste good!  That would be the vice of gluttony.  So, I try to exercise the virtue of self-control.  

Do you have a vice(s)?  What virtue could you employ to prevent your affinity for your vice?  If your vice is alcohol, maybe you can bring a bottle of water to a social gathering.  If it's drugs, maybe you have to use the virtue of wisdom and say no to negative people, places, and things.

To be sure, when you embrace virtues your life will get better.  However, it is important to remember that it is a practice.  Since none of us is ever perfect, you never own a virtue.  You have approximations of virtue.  You get near virtues but you never possess them.  That would be perfect and we know none of us fit that description.  Still, we can aim high and practice virtues to help make our life and the lives of others a little bit better one day at a time. 

At The Coleman Institute, we specialize in helping people get clean clean and stay clean from alcohol and drugs.  If you or someone you love is in need of detox from opiatesalcohol, benzos, Methadone, or Suboxone, please do not hesitant to call Jennifer Pius at 1-877-77-DETOX (33869). 

Tuesday, January 1, 2013

Conquer Yourself!

By
Chris Newcomb, M.Div.

Happy New Year!  I hope that you had a fantastic Christmas and New Year's celebration.  It is 2013 and a new year has arrived!  This is great news.  It is time to embrace change.  It is time to do what you know you've wanted to do for a long time now.  It is time to conquer yourself.  

The Dhammapada once said, "One may conquer in battle a thousand times a thousand men, yet he is the best who conquers himself."  Hard words.  Tough words.  True words.  

It is ourselves that we find the most troubling if we are honest.  If we humbly assess our thoughts and actions we usually can find them lacking to some degree.  It doesn't mean that we're awful people if we find this to be true.  What it means is that we have growth to accomplish.  Namely: we must conquer ourselves. 

How does one conquer ones self?  Very simply:  By choosing to surrender their right to run their lives.  That may seem counter intuitive but it's true.  The way up is down and the way to control is to let go.  

In this New Year, I challenge you to conquer yourself whatever that may look like for you.  Does it mean calling someone and asking for help?  Perhaps.  Does it mean making a verbal confession to someone you've hurt?  Could be.  You will have to decide that for yourself.  However, if you include humility as the main ingredient, you will make the right choices and you will conquer yourself so that you can take control of yourself and your future.  Best wishes to you in 2013 from The Coleman Institute!

At The Coleman Institute, we specialize in helping people get clean clean and stay clean from alcohol and drugs.  If you or someone you love is in need of detox from opiatesalcohol, benzos, Methadone, or Suboxone, please do not hesitant to call Jennifer Pius at 1-877-77-DETOX (33869).