Friday, November 30, 2012

Breathe


By 
Chris Newcomb, M.Div.

When I was in grad school right about the turn of the century (now I feel old), I took a semester long mindfulness-based stress reduction course based on the book Full Catastrophe Living by Jon Kabat-Zinn.  This course changed my life!

If we breathe, we live.  If we don't, we die.  Of course, that is an obvious notion to most of us.  However, many of us have no clue how to actually breathe on a day-to-day basis.  That is, we are usually 'chest breathers'.  Chest breathing is very shallow breathing.  A 'correct' breath goes in through the nose and out through the mouth while the stomach pushes out during the inhale and comes back in during the exhale.  Also, it is best to keep one's shoulders relaxed and down during the duration of the breathing action.  Try it now.  (Insert Jeopardy theme song here).

Notice a difference?  You should feel more centered.  The full breath from the diaphragm/stomach area is way more helpful than from the chest.  Breathing is essential to stay alive but it is also essential to navigate recovery from alcohol and drugs. 

Many times in your recovery, things will not go as planned.  You will be upset, angry, frustrated, sad, bored, and resentful.  The question is how to do you get out of those strong emotions without deciding to use alcohol or drugs?  The answer: breathing.  

The practice of deep breathing helps you learn to notice what your body feels like when it is 'centered' or relaxed.  As you acclimate yourself to this state of being, you begin to crave being in that state.  Therefore, when you are not in a state of relaxation, you will notice it.  Hopefully, then you will decide to engage in deep breathing so you can re-enter a state of relaxation and avoid using drugs and alcohol.  

Breathing is so natural.  It is involuntary.  However, choosing to voluntarily breathe deeply is not easy.  It will take practice but it is worth it.  See if you can take 10 minutes a day and sit quietly by yourself away from any distractions and work on your deep breathing.  See if you don't feel more relaxed, centered, and clear when you are finished.  Then pay attention to the problems that faced you before the deep breathing exercise and see how your perspective may have changed from your deep breathing.  I think it will!  

At The Coleman Institute, we specialize in helping people get clean clean and stay clean from alcohol and drugs. Our goal is to help you relax, get help, and breath normally as they transition to a new life that is chemical free.  If you or someone you love is in need of detox from opiatesalcohol, benzos, Methadone, or Suboxone, please do not hesitant to call Jennifer Pius at 1-877-77-DETOX (33869).  Help, hope and healing begin here!

Thursday, November 29, 2012

Holiday Detox Hours!





Not long ago a friend and yoga teacher said something like, “If you think you’re enlightened, spend a weekend with your parents.”   Getting together during the holidays can be pretty stressful on many levels.  For people raised in the chaotic environment of addiction, or for those who will be with loved ones who are actively abusing substances, it is often more of a relief to get the holidays over with than a joy to experience them.

It is tempting to continue to put off dealing with a loved one’s addiction.  School, jobs, sports, and other commitments seem to take precedence.  Waiting for someone to ‘hit bottom’ can make the life of the addict’s family even more unmanageable as they jump through hoops to try to normalize the situation.

At The Coleman Institute, we offer the first step for people to start their lifetime of Recovery.  It is extremely difficult to stop using opiates without suffering severe physical symptoms.  In early recovery it is also easy to slip when triggers and stressful situations (can you say holidays?) abound.

During December and early January, we will have pretty typical holiday hours for our family practice, but we always see people right through the holidays who are going through a detox.  Many people cannot afford to take regular time off work, and this allows working people and students a chance to get clean without disrupting their lives, and the lives of their families too dramatically.

If you’d like to get details about this, please call our office at 1-877-77-DETOX (33869).  It may be your best holiday in a long time.

-  Joan Shepherd, FNP

Monday, November 26, 2012

Home: It's Not Where You Think It Is



By 
Chris Newcomb, M.Div. 

H.P.T.M (Happy Post Thanksgiving Monday)!   How are you today?  Feeling stuffed?  Shopped out?  Tired?  You're probably not alone.  Let's do an experiement: go complain to a coworker who is suffering similarly and then come back and read the rest of this blog article.  Ready?  GO!

See, didn't that feel good?  Isn't it great to feel understood?  Doesn't it feel nice to be known just as you are?  Over the weekend, millions of people got together in their homes or the home of someone they love to celebrate the good things and people in their lives.  For many, this was a great experience.  They felt 'at home' and secure.  The time went too fast and they are sad that it is over.  

However, for many, the time couldn't pass fast enough for them.  They were counting down the hours to Monday when life would return to it's 'normal' rhythm.  For many, the holidays can make them feel 'emotionally homeless'.  

Feeling emotionally homeless is an awful experience.  In fact, if you are a person who struggles with substance abuse it can be deadly.  That's right, many addicts and alcoholics suffer from this dreaded feeling during the holiday season.  With all the marketing messages focusing on family and holiday time together, many addicts and alcoholics feel overwhelmed, forgotten, unimportant, lonely, and insecure due to strained familial relationships.  

Fortunately, there is hope for the heart!   I read a quote this weekend that is so powerful.  Perhaps it can help you the next time you feel 'emotionally homeless'.  It says, "Home is not where you live, it is where you are understood." 

It's a very simple idea but it's is very profound.  Home can be anywhere we are accepted and understood just as we are.  For some addicts and alcoholics, inpatient rehab can be the first time that they really feel 'at home' because they are understood for the first time.  Similarly, those new to recovery often feel 'at home' in their counselors office where they can be open and honest about their inner lives. 

Do you have a place you can call home where you are understood?  If it is your biological home, that is great!  Enjoy that gift.  Feel the acceptance that your nuclear home provides you.  If it is not your nuclear home, is there a place you can go to receive that understandingEither way, remember that being understood is the beginning of feeling at home!

At The Coleman Institute, we specialize in helping people get clean clean and stay clean from alcohol and drugs. We try to make every patient feel 'at home' when they come for their detox.  If you or someone you love is in need of detox from opiatesalcohol, benzos, Methadone, or Suboxone, please do not hesitant to call Jennifer Pius at 1-877-77-DETOX (33869).  Help, hope and healing begin here!

Friday, November 23, 2012

Bon Jovi's Daughter's Heroin Overdose


By
Chris Newcomb, M.Div.

I love music.  Anyone who knows me will tell you that I am a fanatic about it.  So, today, I share an article with you that saddens me.  One of my favorite bands of all time is Bon Jovi (insert laughs, jokes, put downs here).  They were and still are a band that has been influential for me as a musician.  I remember sitting in the basement of my parents house in 1986 watching MTV and the video for their hit song 'Living on a Prayer" came on.  My entire musical world changed that day.  I grabbed the phone and called a friend who had a similar reaction.  Be that as it may, I would never have thought some 26 years later I would be sharing an article about my musical hero's daughter experiencing a heroin overdose.  Alas, addiction doesn't care about my preferences or Mr. Bon Jovi's either.  

Below is the text from an article from the website www.thefix.com.  Drugs of any kind are dangerous.  Heroin, in particular, has been marketed as a 'chic' drug but it kills way more than makes any one ever look 'chic'!  This information could save someone's life.  Please share! 

At The Coleman Institute, we specialize in helping people get clean clean and stay clean from alcohol and drugs.  We know that addiction and/or alcoholism can strike anyone, anywhere, and anytime.  If you or someone you love is in need of detox from opiatesalcohol, benzos, Methadone, or Suboxone, please do not hesitant to call Jennifer Pius at 1-877-77-DETOX (33869).  Help, hope and healing begin here!


3 Lessons from Bon Jovi's Daughter's Overdose

A Fix expert offers three key safety rules that could potentially save a life in the event of an opioid overdose.

Stephanie Bongiovi is recovering from her
heroin OD. Photo via

11/20/12
You’re safe from minor drug possession arrests if you call 911 after overdosing or witnessing an overdose—at least that’s supposed to be the message of “Good Samaritan” laws passed recently in New York and other states. But last week when rocker Jon Bon Jovi’s 19-year-old daughter overdosed on heroin at Hamilton College in upstate New York, both Stephanie Bongiovi and the student who dialed 911 on her behalf were arrested on criminal heroin charges—which is exactly what the law was enacted to preclude. Fortunately, citing the legislation, prosecutors have now dropped those charges. An article in this week’s Journal of the American Medical Association calls for expansion of Good Samaritan laws and federal action to facilitate the distribution of a safe, nontoxic antidote to overdose on heroin or prescription pain relievers, which is currently in short supply. Read more here, on TIME.com.

If you or a loved one are taking any opioid for any reason, here are three key rules for safety that could make the difference between life and death:

1) Don’t mix painkillers or heroin with alcohol, benzodiapines (Valium, Xanax, etc.) or any other depressant drug (any drug that makes you sleepy or relaxed).  In these instances, 1+1 can equal five: the drugs can multiply each others’ effects in unpredictable ways. If you are prescribed an anti-anxiety or muscle relaxant drug along with a pain reliever, make sure all your doctors know everything that you are taking and do not exceed your prescribed dose.

2) If you see someone become unconscious, turn blue or start snoring strangely or breathing irregularly after taking any of these drugs, DO NOT LET THEM “SLEEP IT OFF.” They may never wake up, as the drugs can kill by slowly stopping breathing. If you have naloxone, use it. And call 911 immediately. If you don't have naloxone and want to keep it on hand, this site provides information on where you can get it, as well as information to encourage physicians to prescribe it for their patients on opioids.

3) If someone has apparently taken an overdose, perform rescue breathing not CPR. Recent CPR classes are instructing people to perform only chest compressions—while this will work for a heart attack, it won’t for an opioid overdose. Check the airway, make sure it is clear, then lift the person’s chin, pinch closed the nose and exhale a breath into them every five seconds.

Thursday, November 22, 2012

Happy Thanksgiving!!!


By 
Chris Newcomb, M.Div. 

Happy Thanksgiving!  Many of you will not read this on Thanksgiving but there are some of you "Type A" people who will read it in between bites of turkey and dressing.  I am counting on you so take your time and don't choke on your food.  Safety first campers!

I hope that today is a great day for you and those you care about.  Please take a few minutes and reflect on the gifts, blessings, good things and people in your life.  Seriously.  Take 5 minutes in a room away from everyone else with a piece of paper and a pen.  Write down every thing you are grateful for in your life.  You'll be amazed at what it can do for you.

Just to show you that I am willing to do what I write, below is my list...I started my iPhone stopwatch (ah the joys of technology) and began to type.  Here it is...

Today I am thankful for:

1.  Fingers that work so I can type this list.
2.  Eyes to see this list as I type.
3.  Ears to hear the clicking of my fingers against the keys on my laptop
4.  Lungs that help me breathe in fresh air as I write for the next 5 minutes
5.  The sunshine outside my office window
6.  The sound of the lawnmower in our front yard at the office.
7.  The banana's on my desk
8.  Computers
9.  Food
10.  Shelter
11. Clothing choices
12.  Cars
13.  Living in America
14.  James Brown
15.  Music
16.  Movies
17.  Birds
18.  Squirrels
19.  Whales
20.  Giraffes
21.  Mom
22.  Dad
23.  3 sisters
24.  Aunt and Uncle
25.  Cousins
26.  Undergraduate degree
27.  Graduate degree
28.  Employment
29.  My wristwatch
30.  Hobbies
31.  In-laws (yes, really)
32.  Thanksgiving meal
33.  Exercise
34.  Friends
35.  Extended family
36.  2 bands
37.  Books
38.  Flowers
39.  Clouds
40.  California
41.  Virginia
42.  The oceans
43.  The internet
44.  Guitars
45.  Drums
46. Concerts
47.  Smile of little kids
48.  Laughter of little kids
49.  Chess
50.  Reading

At The Coleman Institute, we are thankful for the privilege of offering help, hope, and healing to those who struggle with addiction and/or alcoholism as well as to their loved ones and friends who care so deeply about the ones who suffer.  We specialize in helping people get clean clean and stay clean from alcohol and drugs.  If you or someone you love is in need of detox from opiatesalcohol, benzos, Methadone, or Suboxone, please do not hesitant to call Jennifer Pius at 1-877-77-DETOX (33869).  Help, hope and healing begin here!


Wednesday, November 21, 2012

Rosy Thorn or a Thorny Rose?


By 
Chris Newcomb, M.Div.

It's all about attitude.  At least that's what "they" say whoever "they" are?  Are they right?  Probably.  Do we like to admit it?  Usually not.  Perhaps a change of mind is in order.  

Life is full of challenges.  Babies crying.  Bosses whining.  Coworkers crying.  I exaggerate.  But you would agree that life can be a struggle, right?  Having agreed upon this point, we can now look at how we deal with life as it presents itself to us on a daily basis.

We can't control most of what happens around us but we can control our attitude.  It is not always an easy choice but with practice it can become easy.  The question is are we willing to do it.  

Do you see life as a Rosy Thorn or a Thorny Rose?  I once went to an A.A. meeting where a member shared these words: "Life is pain.  Once you accept that, everything else is easy."  Truer words have not been spoken.  

Recovery can be a lot like that.  People come into recovery full of pain, angst, hurt, and frustration.   If they stick and stay, eventually, they begin to see that they were focusing on the thorns of life and missing the beauty of it's rose!  

The fact is life is pain.  However, life is also a beautiful rose of exquisite color with soft, fresh petals that light up their surroundings.  And yes if we look closely like the photo above, even the beautiful rose has a few thorns.    Be careful when grabbing that stem!

Perhaps thorns have a greater purpose in our lives.  For the rose, it protects it from being pulled out of the ground or at least it draws blood from the assailant before it leaves the earth.  For us, thorns can have several greater purposes. 

First, they help us face ourselves.  They show us where we need improvement.  Second, they challenge us.  They make us dig deep and push forward in spite of the pain, the bad feelings, and the doubtful thoughts we experience in light of them.  Last, thorns make us stronger.  If you've ever grabbed the stem of a rose without looking than you are well aware of the damage the thorns can do to you hands and fingers.  What happens after the skin heals?  It is tougher.  There may even be a scar there to remind you not to repeat past "thorny" behaviors (sorry it was there)!

 Today is a brand new day.  In your life and your recovery, choose to embrace the thorns of life as they come your way.  We all know it's not a matter of 'if' but a matter of 'when'.  Embrace the rose...and acknowledge the thorn and the wisdom it may offer you.  

At The Coleman Institute, we specialize in helping people get clean clean and stay clean from alcohol and drugs.  We enjoy helping addicts and alcoholics let go of the thorns they've been squeezing so they can start healing in sobriety and recovery.  If you or someone you love is in need of detox from opiatesalcohol, benzos, Methadone, or Suboxone, please do not hesitant to call Jennifer Pius at 1-877-77-DETOX (33869).  Help, hope and healing begin here!






Thursday, November 15, 2012

Recovery Down on The Ranch



By 
Peter R. Coleman, M.D.

Last weekend Joan and I visited some dear old friends in Nashville – Al Adams and Barbara Larew-Adams.  It was fabulous to reconnect with these two wonderful souls.  I have known them both for over 15 years and we have shared many precious moments and experiences.  Good friendships are one of the cornerstones of recovery and one of the best benefits of sobriety. 

From its inception, Al and Barbara have been very involved with the Recovery Ranch - a cutting edge treatment program on the outskirts of Nashville.  Al left his job in Virginia Beach to start up the men’s program.  Ten years later, the treatment center has grown to 76 beds and for the last couple of years Barbara has taken the position as the Clinical Director for the whole facility.  The Recovery Ranch does fantastic work and really fills an important niche in the spectrum of addiction treatment services.

With 76 beds, The Ranch has stayed full for a number of years.  They have special sections for different groups of patients.  There has always been a women’s program and a men’s program, but now they have added specialized programs for eating disorders, co-occurring psychiatric disorders, and sexual addiction.  They are even in the process of developing a geriatric addiction program.  The Ranch is located in rural Tennessee, about an hour west of Nashville.  The campus spreads out over about 500 acres and includes an active cattle ranch.

Part of the success of the Ranch comes from the fact that the recommended length of treatment is 90 days.  This length of treatment gives patients enough time to really understand addiction and recovery, and enough time to really make changes in their attitudes and behaviors.  Another nice thing about the Ranch is that it is so isolated.  Once patients are there, it is very difficult for them to leave (although I am sure that over the years, there have been a few people who have tried!).  So, once patients make the decision to go to the Ranch, there are few distractions. They have very little choice, but to stay and work on their issues.  The patients really can concentrate on being there.  This makes it easier to “surrender” to the process and allow recovery thoughts and attitudes to take hold.  I believe that surrender and letting go (or in other words - acceptance) is a vital part of the recovery process.

The other unique thing about the Ranch is that, from the beginning, they have recognized that experiential therapy can help patients to overcome deep seated blocks.  Many people struggle with getting into recovery or staying in recovery because of past traumas and childhood issues.  Experiential therapy is a very powerful technique that can not only help patients get in touch with past trauma, but it can actually heal much of the pain.  By re-experiencing the old feelings as an adult, and in a safe place, it is possible to let go of the past and learn how to take care of ourselves in the present. 

The staff at the Ranch has been well trained to help patients with this deep work.  It is nice to see a program doing such good work.  It is nice to know that we have the Ranch as an option for our patients who need this level of care.  

 At The Coleman Institute, we specialize in helping people get clean clean and stay clean from alcohol and drugs.  We also believe in exceptional aftercare such as the services offered at The Ranch.  If you or someone you love is in need of detox from opiatesalcohol, benzos, Methadone, or Suboxone, please do not hesitant to call Jennifer Pius at 1-877-77-DETOX (33869).  Help, hope and healing begin here!

FLEX!


By 
Chris Newcomb, M.Div.

The picture above is of a former bodybuilder named Kenneth Wheeler.  In the 1990's, Wheeler came in 2nd place in the Mr. Olympia bodybuilding contest an amazing 3 times.  He was once described by Arnold Schwarzenegger as, "the greatest bodybuilder he ever saw."  High praise from Mr. Olympia himself!  Wheeler eventually retired from bodybuilding competitions in 2003 due to a hereditary kidney disease that required a kidney transplant.  He is in full health today.  

Why do I put up a picture of  bodybuilder on a substance abuse recovery blog, you might ask?  Several reasons come to mind.  First, Mr. Wheeler is/was known as 'Flex'.  It's his stage name.  So, it coincides with our topic of flexing your courage muscle.  Second, Mr. Wheeler has had to 'muscle' up his courage many times over his career as well as with regards to his personal health.  Now, Flex is an advocate for drug-free bodybuilding.  That takes courage given the amount of steroid use in professional sports much less professional bodybuilding! 

Many of you might think that Mr. Wheeler went a little overboard with his emphasis on personal muscularity.  Be that as it may, I think we can all agree that it takes a certain level of courage to pursue a dream that very few people are successful in accomplishing at the end of the day.  His dream required not just a flexing of physical muscle but rather it required a lot of emotional and mental flexing as well.  It's hard to get up and train 4-6 hours a day every day and to maintain a diet of 5-8,000 calories a day depending on what your body needs.  That takes courage.  Failure can seem imminent.  Competing in professional bodybuilding is a constant invitation to flex your grit and determination in the face of adversity.

And so it is with addiction recovery!  It takes courage to admit you have a problem.  It takes courage to admit you are overwhelmed and unable to fix the problems that have overcome your life.  It takes courage to go to rehab, join an I.O.P (intensive outpatient), or go to a counselor as well as attend 12 Step meetings.  It requires courage to look embarrassment, shame, guilt, and other people's opinions about you directly in the eye and choose to go forward despite what they say.

We see this kind of courage every day at The Coleman Institute.  It is a pleasure to see it in motion.  Every day at our facility, men and women come in on their last bit of hope riding on the fumes of their courage hoping that it will work. It is our pleasure to show them that their courage is worth believing in and taking that step of faith was a wise move!  

Today, let me encourage you to flex your 'courage muscles'!  Just like Flex Wheeler above, if you want it bad enough, you can change.  If you're willing to flex your belief, your faith, and your courage in the recovery process, you will find a brand new life waiting for you.  Perhaps, you need to check yourself into a residential treatment facility?  Maybe it is time to start attending 12 Step Meetings.  Remember that courage is not the absence of fear but the choice to continue in spite of the fear

At The Coleman Institute, we specialize in helping people get clean clean and stay clean from alcohol and drugs.  We love to see the courage our clients bring to our facility when they decide they are ready to fight and win against addiction.  If you or someone you love is in need of detox from opiatesalcohol, benzos, Methadone, or Suboxone, please do not hesitant to call Jennifer Pius at 1-877-77-DETOX (33869).  Help, hope and healing begin here!


Monday, November 12, 2012

Perfectly Imperfect


By 
Chris Newcomb, M.Div.

I receive daily inspirational texts to my cell phone about recovery-related topics.  I signed up to receive them because we are thinking of implementing the same technology at The Coleman Institute.  I'd like to share one I received yesterday with you. 

It reads, "I am perfectly imperfect, fully human, able to make mistakes, learn from them and love myself as I am."  The irony is that I received this text in the middle of an activity where I was demanding a lot of myself (read: perfection) that realistically would not happen.  Truth shows up in the most opportune moments, doesn't it?!?

However, what if I (and you) took that statement to heart and made it my (our) mantra today.  Admitting that I am less than perfect is not a fun exercise in self-understanding.  I imagine you feel the same way.  However, lying to myself doesn't do me much good either!  Self-knowledge, while very important, is not for the meek of heart.  

If we accept our imperfection, this frees us up to a life without shame.  If I have already confessed my imperfection, it is difficult for me to feel shameful when I make that inevitable mistake(s). 

Having admitted my imperfection, I now make room for allowing inevitable mistakes in my life.  It doesn't mean I try to make mistakes rather it just means that I know they will happen from time to time and it's not the end of the world.  

Admitting the ability to make mistakes is the first thing we do when we accept our imperfection.  Unfortunately, many people stop there.  We must press on and realize that our mistakes are a chance to learn something about ourselves, other people, and the greater world around us.  

If we correctly learn a lesson from a mistake, there is a good chance that we will not repeat it.  As a matter of fact, the more we are aware of how we make mistakes the more we might be able to predict such mistakes before they occur.  How nice would that be to cut off a mistake at the pass before it occurs!

Finally, after admitting my imperfection, becoming aware of my mistakes, and learning their inherent lesson(s), I can choose to love myself in spite of those imperfections.  I get to love myself regardless of my mistakes because my value is not based on my mistakes rather it comes from the very fact that I am alive as a human being before I ever try to earn my keep, so to speak.  

Regardless of whether or not you suffer from addiction or alcoholism, embracing imperfection is a healing choice.  Of course, for substance abusers, this is a crucial decision.  Self-acceptance begins with self-awareness and self-awareness leads us to the truth that we are perfectly imperfect.  Accepts is the next choice to make and then we become more settled 'in our own skin.'  And for those struggling with substance, it is critical to learn to feel comfortable in your own skin because half the reason people abuse substances is because they don't feel comfortable in their own skin

 At The Coleman Institute, we specialize in helping people get clean clean and stay clean from alcohol and drugs.  We are in the business of helping our clients realize, understand, and accept their perfect imperfection so they can be free from substance abuse.  If you or someone you love is in need of detox from opiatesalcohol, benzos, Methadone, or Suboxone, please do not hesitant to call Jennifer Pius at 1-877-77-DETOX (33869).  Help, hope and healing begin here!

Friday, November 9, 2012

Are You Vulnerable?


By 

Chris Newcomb, M.Div.

My line of work is an amazing adventure filled with mountaintops and valleys.  Oftentimes, I see people on the brink of destruction who turn their lives around and become a new creation.   Sometimes, I see people who are down and out who come to detox and then I never hear from them again.  Regardless, the one unifying thread in all of their stories is vulnerability.

 Every patient who comes to our institute chooses to be vulnerable whether they realize it or not.  The reality is that it's very hard to come out of the shadows of drug addiction and alcoholism into the light of vulnerability, sobriety, and recovery.  It is a huge risk and many of them choose to embrace it while others come in kicking and screaming!  

The most powerful moments are when a breakthrough occurs:  a woman begins to smile for the first time believing that she just might have hope in a different future.  A man opens up and shares his feelings for the first time in a genuine way.  A couple on the brink of divorce decide to give it one more try when the spouse struggling with addiction and/or alcoholism decides to be vulnerable and ask for help and displays a willingness to take direction.  

These miracles happen every day.  Again, the common thread is the choice to embrace vulnerability.  It is a hard thing to do at first for recovering people because life feels so raw and sharp, and edgy  without the buffer of drugs and/or alcohol.  Still, many are brave and make that difficult choice to dive headlong into the pool of vulnerability.

How open are you to being vulnerable?  Are you willing to be open to at least one person in your life you can trust to share all the junk you struggle with daily?  If not, why are you hesitating?  If you are afraid to be vulnerable ask yourself why that is a problem for you.  I encourage you to seek help so you can receive the joys of being vulnerable in a safe and trusting context.  The more vulnerable you are with the right people the better your life will get! 

At The Coleman Institute, we specialize in helping people get clean clean and stay clean from alcohol and drugs.  We are in the business of helping our clients choose to be vulnerable about their substance abuse problem(s) so they can change their lives for the better by living free from substance abuse.  If you or someone you love is in need of detox from opiatesalcohol, benzos, Methadone, or Suboxone, please do not hesitant to call Jennifer Pius at 1-877-77-DETOX (33869).  Help, hope and healing begin here!




Wednesday, November 7, 2012

Got an Open Mind?


By
Chris Newcomb, M.Div.  
 
H.O.W. is an acronym that is often taught to newcomers in the 12 step community so they can learn to stay sober.  It stands for Honest, Open, and Willing.  That is, if you want to stay sober, you must do the following.  

You must be honest.  If you lie, you undermine your chances at recovery.  The truth is hard to tell.  As the saying goes, "you're only as sick as your secrets."  Telling the truth will set you free.  

You must be open (see pic above).  That is, you must open your mind to consider a different way of life, different ideas, and different ways of doing things that may fly in the face of your preconceived notions of right and wrong, good and bad, cool and uncool, etc.  

You must be willing.  Willingness is very important.  If you are not willing, you might as well hang it up.  It won't happen.  You must be willing to take suggestions AND try to do what is suggested.  It's the only way.  

I believe that you must be open more than anything.  If you are not open to honesty, how can you be honest?  If you are not open to willingness, how can you be willing?  In fact, people get stuck in drug and alcohol abuse exactly because they are not open.  They are closed off:  closed off to love, closed off to self-discipline, closed off to self-care, closed off to so many life giving things that they spiral down into their addiction.  

Today is a new day.  We can change anytime we want to change.  I encourage you to chose openness.  Open your mind.  Be open to honesty.  Be open to willingness.  Be open to change.  Be open to a new life.  Be open to letting go of your old life.  Be open to a new existence.  Then, pass it on!

At The Coleman Institute, we specialize in helping people get clean clean and stay clean from alcohol and drugs.  We are in the business of helping our clients open their minds so they can change their lives for the better by living free from substance abuse.  If you or someone you love is in need of detox from opiatesalcohol, benzos, Methadone, or Suboxone, please do not hesitant to call Jennifer Pius at 1-877-77-DETOX (33869).  Help, hope and healing begin here!