Friday, September 28, 2012

It's a Miracle

By 
Chris Newcomb, M.Div.

"It's a miracle", sang Boy George in his heyday in the early 1980's with his pop band Culture Club.  The question is what type of miracle was Mr. George (a.k.aGeorge Alan O'Dowd) singing about in this classic hit?  Who knows but he had one thing right:  miracles do happen and we should pay attention to them!

For example, being alive is a miracle.  Think about it: the fact that you are reading this article is a miracle because of the miracle of life.  You are alive.  I'll say it again, YOU ARE ALIVE!  Isn't that amazing.  There are billions of people who are not alive today.  They will never see the first rays of dawn's light.  They will miss the full moon rising in the evening sky.  They will never again feel the warmth of the hands of a lover, the cool, refreshing taste of a glass of lemonade on a hot summer day or anything else we experience as those who are 6 feet above ground.  Today, just for a moment, let's embrace this wonderful gift we've been given called life!

How can you celebrate this miracle?  In a myriad of ways.  Why not try smiling first.  It's been proven it takes more muscles in your face to frown than to smile.  Wonder what that tells us?  It's easier to be happy.  You have to work at being mad, angry, resentful, bitter, etc.  So start by smiling!

Bless someone else with a kind word.  The word 'bless' means "to bestow good of any kind upon".  You can bless someone with a hug, a handshake, a smile, a kind word, a free dinner, a back rub, a sincere compliment, holding the door open, letting someone ahead of you in line and many more.  Can you think of any ways to bless someone today right where you are?  

Another miracle that has happened today is that you are reading this article!  That means all my slaving away at his monumental literary work isn't for nothing.  I am relieved and sarcastic!  No seriously, thank you for reading this article.  I hope it has been helpful for you.  May you have a wonderful day and may all the things you want to come true in your life...come true!!!  

....and remember to be grateful for the miracle ;)

"Believable Hope" in Buckhannon, West Virginia




By
Peter R. Coleman, M.D. 
Last week I had the wonderful opportunity of traveling to Buckhannon in West Virginia, in order to give a talk on addiction, recovery and new treatment options.  I had been asked to give this talk to the community because we have had a number of patients from that area.  The patients are doing very well and the families of these patients were very keen to have us come and talk to other parents and families and help them understand the disease and how recovery can work.  It was a fabulous trip.

The drive up to West Virginia was beautiful.  At this time of year, the mountains and the forests are incredibly beautiful.  The farmland was gorgeous.  It reminded me of my home country of New Zealand.  We were warmly welcomed as soon as we arrived. That evening I spoke to over 100 people at the local high school. There were a lot of moms and dads, grandparents, brothers and sisters, and even some small babies. 

Everyone was very interested to hear about addiction and the different treatment options.  I always like speaking about the disease of addiction.  I like explaining how the disease of addiction is a no fault illness.  There is so much evidence that the disease is caused by a brain dysfunction in the Nucleus Accumbens ( pleasure center).  These days there is also a lot of information available about how the brain works and why people have cravings and relapse.  

I find it is helpful for everyone to understand what the disease of addiction really is because it is so easy to blame addicts and look down on them and this is never helpful. The audience in Upshur County was very attentive.  There have been a number of patients who have been through our 3 day Accelerated Opiate Detoxification(AOD) program, received their  Naltrexone Implants and are now doing very well.  It was gratifying to see a lot of these people in their home communities, with their families, looking and feeling so good.

One of the nice things about a small community is just that – it's a small community. People know each other, people care about each other, and people support each other. Up in Buckhannon, it was easy to feel that level of support and love.  There are many aspects to recovery, and love and support are two of the big ones.

Another aspect of recovery is the concept of Believable Hope.  I have just been reading a new book written by Michael Cartwright called “Believable Hope” – it is very good. The idea is that in order to recover, or really make any changes in life, it is essential that we develop believable hope.  This believable hope is not just the idea that there may be hope – it is a realistic belief, a certainty perhaps, that we can recover.  One of the best ways we can get this “believable hope” is by seeing lots of other people recovering – if they can recover, and I am like them, then of course I can recover.

What is starting to happen now in Upshur County is that there is a small but growing nexus of recovering people.  It is going viral.  As one person recovers and lives a life of recovery they spread believable hope to everyone around them.  My hope is that this virus spreads like crazy.

Monday, September 24, 2012

Billie Joe, Gaga, and Fiona...OH MY!!!






































































































































































































































































































It's been a rough past few days for several celebrities.  In the past week, Billie Joe Armstrong from the punk group Green Day went off in a tirade, broke his guitar and stormed off stage during a concert.  He is now in rehab.  

 





Lady Gaga, known for outrageous costumes and catchy pop tunes smoked marijuana in the middle of her concert in Amsterdam.  She is an artist who likes to push people's buttons both musically and in her lifestyle.  Many adore her for her frank nature while others deplore her.  Either way, she makes money and has influence over a generation of new listeners.








Finally, Fiona Apple was busted for possession of hash in Sierra Blanco, Texas.  She was released on $10,000 bond.  Ms. Apple is currently on tour supporting her new album.  Interestingly, one of the lyrics off her new record ominously says, "Every single night's a fight with my brain".  Many addicts have said the same thing about their struggle with substance abuse!

Many will argue that pot is natural and should be made illegal.  Yes, pot is natural.  So are poisonous mushrooms but your mother said not to eat them, correct?!?  Pot is psychologically addictive and a new study points to permanent IQ damage when teens use marijuana.  The evidence is clear that it is not good for you.  Understandably, there are patients who are able to use it under doctor's supervision for some diseases like MS and even for terminal illnesses.  However, that discussion is beyond the scope of this article.  

No one is immune from drug and alcohol abuse.  Three famous celebrities with enough money and power to do a lot of good in this world recently made poor choices due to their struggle with substance abuse.  We don't know for sure to what level these three are having a problem with alcohol and drugs except what has been presented in the news.  In truth, these incidents could be the first of a great tidal wave of bad decisions for all three.  The only way to keep that from happening is for them to take seriously a possible addiction to alcohol and drugs.  The unfortunate fall out is that they are 'hero's' to millions of people and have such a powerful influence by what they say and do!

We bring these headlines to your attention not to make fun or judge these celebrities.  The truth is they are human and have needs, wants, dreams, and goals like the rest of us.  After all, Plato once said, "Be kind to all you meet for everyone is fighting a great battle!"

That being said, we wish Lady Gaga, Billie Joe Armstrong, and Fiona Apple the recovery that they deserve and freedom from the power of addiction and substance abuse.  We hope that they will embrace recovery and influence millions of people to do the same. 

At The Coleman Institute, while we are not rock stars, we do love a good song!   However, our real passion is specializing in helping people get clean clean and stay clean from alcohol and drugs.  If you or someone you love is in need of detox from opiatesalcohol, benzos, Methadone, or Suboxone, please do not hesitant to call Jennifer Pius at 1-877-77-DETOX (33869).  Help, hope and healing begin here!

- Chris Newcomb, M.Div.

Saturday, September 22, 2012

Dr. Coleman Speaks in Louisville, KY


Dr. Coleman spoke this past Thursday, September 20th at The Gait Hotel in downtown Louisville, KY as a guest of Dr. Joe Koenigsmark who is the Regional Medical Director of The Coleman Institute in Jeffersonville, IN.  Dr. Coleman, the Founder/CEO/National Medical Director of The Coleman Institute, spoke on the topic of "Substance Abuse and Opiate Addiction: Innovative Treatments".  The event was attended by local social workers, treatment center representatives and other treatment providers. 

We want to thank Dr. Koenigsmark and Jeanetter Basham, and all the volunteers who put together a great event for the public.  Thanks for inviting Dr. Coleman to speak, the privilege was ours!  Louisville and Jeffersonville were great cities to visit!

At The Coleman Institute, we specialize in helping people get clean clean and stay clean from alcohol and drugs.  We are committed to sharing, informing, and encouraging people to get clean and stay clean from chemical dependency.  If you or someone you love is in need of detox from opiatesalcohol, benzos, Methadone, or Suboxone, please do not hesitant to call Jennifer Pius at 1-877-77-DETOX (33869).  Help, hope and healing begin here!

Friday, September 21, 2012

Dr. Coleman in WDTV Interview

Dr.  Coleman spoke this past Wednesday, September 19 at Buckhannon-Upshur County High School.  Here is the news coverage of the event that aired that evening on WDTV!



Wednesday, September 19, 2012

Dr. Coleman Speaks in Buckhannon, WV

By
Chris Newcomb, M.Div. 

Tonight was a very special occasion.  Dr. Coleman was invited by The Get Clean Stay Clean Foundation to speak at Buckhannon-Upshur County High School on the topic of "Substance Abuse and Opiate Addiction: Innovative Treatments"!  He was excited to share his medical expertise as well as his experience, strength, and hope to the greater community of Buckhannon.  After his speech, there was a fantastic Q&A session and he answered many great questions from the engaged and concerned audience.  

We are told 100 people were in attendance!  We report that number, not to brag, but to celebrate the opportunity to share, inform, and encourage that many people about how to get clean and stay clean from chemical dependency.  It was amazing to see parents, young adults, teenagers, and senior adults all gathered together for a common purpose: ending drug and alcohol addiction!   

We want to thank Amy Summerfield, Lisa Shaw, and all the volunteers who put together a great event for the public.  Thanks for inviting Dr. Coleman to speak, the privilege was ours!  Stay tuned as we will be traveling tomorrow to Indiana....

At The Coleman Institute, we specialize in helping people get clean clean and stay clean from alcohol and drugs.  We are committed to sharing, informing, and encouraging people to get clean and stay clean from chemical dependency.  If you or someone you love is in need of detox from opiatesalcohol, benzos, Methadone, or Suboxone, please do not hesitant to call Jennifer Pius at 1-877-77-DETOX (33869).  Help, hope and healing begin here!

Monday, September 17, 2012

Tolerance: Are You Tolerant of It?


By
Chris Newcomb, M.Div. 

As a young boy, I can remember certain family members talking up a storm about this political party or that religious group in a voice of disdain and disgust.  Most of the conversations flew over my head at the time.  I remember they would always look at me and say, "Christopher (my full, legal name also given when I am in trouble or something important is about to be said), there are two things in life you never talk about with other people: politics and religion!"  It left me thinking, "Well, who else do I talk to about them because I don't talk to myself about them?"  Always the literal thinker, I think I missed the point!  

I have a question for you today.  What do you think of when you hear or read the word 'tolerance'?  It's a word that we hear thrown around quite about in the public square these days.  

Tolerance is defined as, "a fair, objective, and permissive attitude toward those whose opinions, practices, race, religion, nationality, etc., differ from one's own".  That is, you may not agree with someone about their particular view(s) however you are agreeable to their right to have differing views from your own.  This is called living in 'intellectual tension' or 'cognitive dissonance' and, while not always a pleasant feeling, it is the mark of a truly mature individual.  

Tolerance is a very important concept in recovery.  The main reason is addicts and alcoholics are famous for wanting things to go their way and for people to think and act like they want them to.  The problem with this tendency is that it often breeds resentment and bitterness which, when left unchecked, can lead people to relapse.

Are you tolerant?  Do you have a hard time letting people think things you disagree with or live in a way that you would not live?  Do you feel the need to judge, resent, or correct people who act and think differently than you?  All of us are tempted to do it from time to time.  It is a process to learn to let go and live and let live as they say.  However, it is worth it when you finally get to the place of true tolerance.  We are bigger than our beliefs, our thoughts, and our actions.  We all deserve love, respect and kindness.  This week why not practice tolerance to all whom you meet!  

At The Coleman Institute, we specialize in helping people get clean clean and stay clean from alcohol and drugs.  We practice an attitude of loving tolerance towards all our patients before, during, and after their detox with us.  To us, it's not important what you've done, it's more important to be who you want to be as a sober person.  If you or someone you love is in need of detox from opiatesalcohol, benzos, Methadone, or Suboxone, please do not hesitant to call Jennifer Pius at 1-877-77-DETOX (33869).  Help, hope and healing begin here!



Saturday, September 15, 2012

The Gift of Gratitude


By 
Chris Newcomb, M.Div.

Ever felt blue?  Ever sat quietly in your house or office and felt inner discontent.  If you have a pulse, you've probably experienced what I'm talking about.  That inner feeling that just says, "blah"!  It's not a fun feeling.  There is an antidote.  It's called gratitude. 

Gratitude is a wonder working quality that we can cultivate in our lives.  It is very simply, requires little effort, provides comfort, and changes our perspective.  So, as an example of how to exercise gratitude, I am now going to write a gratitude list to share with you.  Once you read mine, create your own and see if you feel any different.  

I am grateful:
  • To live in the United States of America.
  • That I am alive today.
  • That I have freedom of speech.
  • That I am healthy.
  • I have eyes to see, ears to hear, a mouth to speak, hands to do many things.
  • I have feet to walk.
  • I have an education.
  • I have access to clean drinking water (1 billion people at this very moment do not).
  • I have a job.
  • I have family.
  • I have friends.
  • I have hobbies.
  • I am safe.
  • I am loved.
  • I am forgiven.
  • I am admired
  • I am not alone.
I am learning to be grateful.  It's not easy.  Life doesn't meet my expectations all the time.  I sure you've experienced the same thing.  However, we can always choose gratitude.  When we do, we find out life is not that bad after all.  What great news to consider when we're feeling "blah" on any given day.  

At The Coleman Institute, we specialize in helping people get clean clean and stay clean from alcohol and drugs.  We are grateful we get to help patients get clean so, in turn, they can experience the gift of gratitude and share it with others.  If you or someone you love is in need of detox from opiatesalcohol, benzos, Methadone, or Suboxone, please do not hesitant to call Jennifer Pius at 1-877-77-DETOX (33869).  Help, hope and healing begin here!

Thursday, September 13, 2012

Sarcasm: You Got a Problem With that?!?!

By
Chris Newcomb, M.Div.

Admittedly, writing this column was a lot of fun!  I love sarcasm especially if it is in good clean fun.  Most great comedy movies are built around sarcasm.  However, sarcasm can be very damaging to those to whom it is directed.

Sarcasm, as defined by Dictionary.com, is, "a sharply ironical taunt; sneering or cutting remark."  For example, if I say to you, "You're ugly and your mother dresses you funny," I have just used sarcasm and lost a blog reader in just one sentence!  Of course, I would never say that to you!   But you get my point.  Sarcasm can wound the soul very quickly.  That's why in recovery we want to avoid it like the plague!

Often times, sarcasm is really built on a foundation of unresolved anger.  We all get angry and that is normal and ok.  What we do with the anger is what is most important.  Using drugs or drinking are not acceptable practices for those who are choosing sobriety and recovery.  Dealing with your anger is the best decision to make so that you can stay sober.  Here's how...

Be direct!  That's right.  I said it.  It's hard to do.  Telling your true inner feelings is very difficult especially when the other person is your boss, best friend, spouse, or Mike Tyson.  Leave Mr. Tyson alone and go to therapy for that one!   It is difficult when people who anger us are most close to us because we fear loss of intimacy and relationship with that person.  

In order to resolve anger in a healthy way, you must understand why you are angry.  Once you figure out why you are angry, you can then explain that to the offender.  You can ask the offender to discontinue that line of behavior(s).  If necessary, you can protect yourself by limiting contact with the offending party until you feel more safe emotionally. 

The best way to deal with these issues is to deal directly with your anger with the person that you have the issue and then let humor play a healing role in the equation.  This keeps the two from being mixed and confused.  The other person will clearly know where you stand and then you can get to the business of repairing the relationship.  Isn't that what we want in the end anyway?  Resolution is a great thing!

At The Coleman Institute, we specialize in helping people get clean and stay clean from alcohol and drugs.  We help patients get clean so they can learn to deal with their feelings and not choose to resolve them through substance abuse!  If you or someone you love is in need of detox from opiatesalcohol, benzos, Methadone, or Suboxone, please do not hesitant to call Jennifer Pius at 1-877-77-DETOX (33869).  Help, hope and healing begin here!

Wednesday, September 12, 2012

Define Yourself

By 
Chris Newcomb, M.Div.  

Who are you?  It's a good question and a great song by the rock band The Who!  But, I digress.  Perhaps you can put that song on whilst reading this blog for the full effect.  

Now, onto the topic at hand.  How do you define yourself?  Your values?  Your morals?  Your dreams?  Your aspirations?  

It is hard to know who we are on the inside sometimes.  Often times, family and friends, while well meaning, try to tell us who we are supposed to be.  Expectations from society tell us who we should be.  Movies, magazines, and TV shows add to the noisy cacophony of voices vying to make us into their image.

Many people entering sobriety realize how much they were influenced by the drug and alcohol scene.  With distance, they see how much peer pressure influenced their decisions to "just take a little hit" or "have a tall cool one" in order to fit in.  Dissent is never popular particularly in the party scene.  It is blasphemy to say that you don't drink or do drugs and that you are perfectly happy that way.  Try it sometime.  Let me know how that works for you.  

Which brings me back to my original question:  How do you define yourself?  Or do you choose not to define yourself and have someone else define you for you?  Perhaps it's time to make a change.  If you learn how to define yourself, you will probably find way more peace and contentment. 

Now, let me be clear, that doesn't mean that we don't choose an attitude of humility and openness.  We get the final say to embrace or discard whatever potential identities are presented to us.  That is our right and privilege.  However, that doesn't mean that we close ourselves down to possibilities and suggestions because we may miss some very vital information that will be for our benefit.  

Ask yourself these questions as you seek to define yourself by yourself:  Who am I?  Where have I been?  Where am I going?  Who do I want to be?  How near or far away am I from being that person.  What can I change this moment to put me on the path toward fulfilling my goal of defining myself?  If I can't change something, what can I let go of to help me move closer toward fulfilling my goal of defining myself? 

At The Coleman Institute, we specialize in helping people get clean and stay clean from alcohol and drugs.  We help patients get clean so they can begin to define themselves in a different way as sober people and not substance abusers!  If you or someone you love is in need of detox from opiatesalcohol, benzos, Methadone, or Suboxone, please do not hesitant to call Jennifer Pius at 1-877-77-DETOX (33869).  Help, hope and healing begin here!

Friday, September 7, 2012

Loving Kindness

 By

Chris Newcomb, M.Div. 

It's hard to have a good attitude on a daily basis.  We look at the news and out on the street and often times it seems our world is just getting more and more crazy.  Maybe that is the case or maybe we just know about it more often because of the lightning fast updates via social media like Facebook, Twitter, and other popular technological advances.  

Personally, I don't think the world has necessarily gotten worse.  After all, it was only in the 1940's that a man with a very bad mustache convinced the German people to commit heinous crimes against the Jewish people in Nazi Germany and beyond.  Still, our world today has enough bad stuff to go around for sure.  

Therefore, I present to you: Loving Kindness!  The concept is represented in most major religions.   The good news is the concept works regardless of philosophical, religious, or non-religious persuasion.  It seems to generally refer to acts of kindness that come from a base of love.  That is, altruistic actions that are not motivated by selfishness or ego rather that are driven out of care and compassion for our neighbor over ourselves. 

Many of you may remember learning the 'Golden Rule' when you were a kid: "Do unto others as you would have done to you."  Makes perfect sense doesn't it?  Of course it does, until you try to put it into action.  Reality is we don't like everyone and everyone doesn't like us.  So much for easy Golden Rule implementation, huh!  

Enter loving kindness.  When we speak from a place of love, we build up and encourage not tear down and discourage.  When we act from a place of love, we heal wounds instead of creating fresh ones.  When we help from a place of love, we go the extra mile not for our own ego and self-flattery but because the other person needs the help and we want to help them just to help them.  

Loving kindness is a high standard.  It's not easy to do.  It's not easy to continue to do.  But, it is worth it.  The world needs more loving kindness.  However, you have to demonstrate loving kindness to yourself first. 

If you don't take care of yourself, you can't really help anyone else.  This is especially true with drug and alcohol addiction.  Choosing sobriety is a pure act of loving kindness towards yourself.  Continuing in sobriety and practicing recovery is also a continual act of loving kindness towards yourself.  When you genuinely practice loving kindness towards yourself, guess what happens?  You stop beating yourself up.  You start believing in your own worth.  And then, as if magically, your vision is changed much like the Grinch's heart grew 3 sizes that day when he realized the joy of Christmas and joined all the Hoo's in Hooville singing and laughing and celebrating.  And, the cool part is, you don't have to wait until Christmas to practice humble loving kindness towards yourself!  

Choose loving kindness and apply it towards yourself today.  If you do that, you will be unable to contain it tomorrow towards others.  Just another gift that sobriety and recovery brings those who choose to stop the destruction of addiction and start living in the healing of recovery!  

At The Coleman Institute, we specialize in helping people get clean and stay clean from alcohol and drugs.  We practice loving kindness towards all of our patients by offering a safe, comfortable, and non-judgmental environment that promotes healing.  If you or someone you love is in need of detox from opiatesalcohol, benzos, Methadone, or Suboxone, please do not hesitant to call Jennifer Pius at 1-877-77-DETOX (33869).  Help, hope and healing begin here!

Wednesday, September 5, 2012

Great Expectations?


By

Chris Newcomb, M.Div. 

I expect a lot in life.  For example, I expect to wake up tomorrow morning.  Yes, I think that is a reasonable thing for life to provide for me, namely, another day 6 feet above ground.  Most people would agree that it is reasonable to expect to continue living.  However, on average, 250,000 to 300,000 people die per day around the world.  They probably expect to live too.  Disappointing, I'm sure! 

Sometimes, I get disappointed as well.  For example, I expect to be a millionaire.  It hasn't happened yet.  Of course, if you make 'yet' an acronym (i.e. 'y.e.t'.) it stands for 'Your Eligible Too', it is always a possibility!  However, I have kept my day job, ergo, this new blog for you to read.  

We all have expectations.  There is nothing wrong with expectations.  The problem comes when our expectations and reality don't exactly match up.  And when they don't match up, it can be the perfect storm for a relapse.  

People often use disappointment from crushed expectations as an excuse to use drugs and/or alcohol.  As a matter of fact, people can even go so far as to create really unrealistic expectations so that they are more likely to be disappointed so they can then use drugs and/or alcohol!  This disease is truly cunning, baffling,and powerful!

 Those who have had some time in recovery understand the importance of tempering our expectations with patience and a realistic view of life.  It is likely that many of our expectations will not come true.  That doesn't mean we need to relapse.  And, to be sure, some of our expectations will come true and that is not a reason to relapse either! 

The number one reason to pay attention to our expectations is the potential for resentment to crop up when our expectations are not met.  Resentment is not something an addict or alcohol can afford to experience because the majority are powerless against it.  More people have relapsed due to resentment then I care to think about. 

Are your expectations realistic?  Do you get disappointed easily?  Are you able to handle that disappointment in a healthy and constructive way?  Is there resentment you need to release in order to stay sober?  Think about it.  I expect it! ;)

At The Coleman Institute, we specialize in helping people get clean and stay clean from alcohol and drugs.  We help people release their unrealistic expectations about drugs and alcohol so they can become healthy, sober people.  If you or someone you love is in need of detox from opiatesalcohol, benzos, Methadone, or Suboxone, please do not hesitant to call Jennifer Pius at 1-877-77-DETOX (33869).  Help, hope and healing begin here!



Monday, September 3, 2012

Pain for Growth?




By
Chris Newcomb, M.Div.

Most people avoid pain.  It's a natural response.  Personally, I can't stand walking outside in my bare feet.  Yes, I'm one of THOSE people.  It's not that I don't like the au naturalle feeling of no shoes.  It's that I can't walk because the bottom of my feet are uber tender to things like rocks, bugs, and heat!  Man Card officially revoked!  

Maybe, however, some pain can be good for us.  Perhaps pain, if viewed correctly, can be a catalyst for growth and change.  For example, if you saw a friend have a heart attack, you might reconsider your diet because the pain of seeing your friend suffer might wake you up to the reality that you could have a heart attack if you don't make some lifestyle changes.  

If pain, rightly understand, can be good for us, what do we do with it?  Pain is a great teacher.  It helps you to understand what you don't know.  For example, when I was in grad school, I contracted a rare form of pneumonia called Eosiniphilic Pneumonia.  The first 3 diagnoses I was given was AIDS, Cancer, and Emphysema.  It was a bad day that day.  

However, through that journey, I learned a few things.  First, take nothing for granted, especially your health.  It can be here early in the morning and gone by this afternoon.  Second, breathing is a wonderful gift.  You don't know how much you like being able to breathe until you can't (that's right smokers I'm looking at you...no judgment here...just encouragement...you CAN quit and your lungs WILL thank you for it!).  Last, live like there is no tomorrow because there may not be one.  

Addiction teaches us lots of things too.  Things like pain doesn't stop until you stop doing what causes the pain.  It shows us our limits and our breaking points.  Finally, it teaches us that humility, openness, and willingness are the keys to escape the prison cell of addiction that isolates and destroys addicts and alcoholics.  

What do you think of the pain in your life?  Has it been brought on by your addiction(s).  Are you willing to examine it?  Could there be a lesson in the pain?  It may not feel good but perhaps the pain is trying to tell you something.  Ask and listen...you might be surprised at the answer.  

At The Coleman Institute, we specialize in helping people get clean and stay clean from alcohol and drugs.  We help people examine the pain of their addiction to drugs and/or alcohol so they can grow into new, sober and recovering people.  If you or someone you love is in need of detox from opiatesalcohol, benzos, Methadone, or Suboxone, please do not hesitant to call Jennifer Pius at 1-877-77-DETOX (33869).  Help, hope and healing begin here!